Month: May 2015

Note from David Paul’s Blog About Bernard Kops

thisroominsunlightcoverThese impressive reviews of This Room in the Sunlight: Collected Poems are  a reflection of the love and affection for Bernard Kops and reveal the high esteem in which he is held.  But will it be enough to convince the book trade and draw in readers? I’d be interested in some feedback.

“I know of few writer-prophets as undeservedly unhonoured in their country as the extraordinarily prolific playwright, novelist, autobiographer, poet and teacher Bernard Kops…Read more

Fifty Years Later, Why Does ‘Eichmann in Jerusalem’ Remain Contentious? – NYTimes.com

Each week in Bookends, two writers take on pressing and provocative questions about the world of books. This week, Adam Kirsch and Rivka Galchen on why Hannah Arendt’s “Eichmann in Jerusalem” remains contentious fifty years after it was first published.

via Fifty Years Later, Why Does ‘Eichmann in Jerusalem’ Remain Contentious? – NYTimes.com.

‘Wonder of Wonders,’ by Alisa Solomon – NYTimes.com

In my family, we have a ritual. (Tradition!) After a particularly wonderful Shabbat or holiday dinner, we channel my great-grandmother Pearl Gottler and chant in unison, “Ach, I’m stoffed. I’m bloated. I couldn’t eat another bite.”

That’s what reading “Wonder of Wonders” is like. It is as rich and dense as a chocolate babka. Delicious, yes, but so crammed with tasty layers you have to pace yourself. You appreciate the gazillion buttery striations while wondering if there had to be quite so many of them.

via ‘Wonder of Wonders,’ by Alisa Solomon – NYTimes.com.

Three on a Match – The New Yorker

Daniel Craig, Rachel Weisz, and Rafe Spall in Pinter’s pas de trois.“Harold Pinter’s artistic vision focussed less on love than on the con. Born in 1930, Pinter grew up Jewish in modest circumstances in London’s East End, the beloved only child of hardworking parents, whose own forebears had emigrated to escape the pogroms in Poland and Russia at the turn of the last century. In 1939, Pinter, along with twenty-four other kids from his school, was evacuated to a mock-Gothic castle in Cornwall. He called this separation from his parents “traumatic,” and, in Michael Billington’s ample 1996 biography, he described a heart-wrenching pilgrimage that the couple made to see him during his exile on the coast. “When they left to get the bus it was a long way back to the lodge for me to walk,” Pinter, who died in 2008, said. “But I went all the way to the castle and looked back and could just see them as pinpoints waiting for the bus on the road; and I suddenly ran all the way back to them over the mounds of grass, racing towards them and of course they came towards me too.” That was love. But there’s no drama in reciprocation. Spiritually orphaned—“There was no fixed sense of being . . . of being . . . at all,” Pinter said of his life during the evacuation—the burgeoning playwright was inducted then, and during the war-torn years that followed, into a world of displaced boys, lads who showed him how guile, lies, and emotional distance could not only help get the girl but also contribute to her destruction. “I think as a result of that loss and confusion, one became, generally speaking, nastier,” he said. “Horrid is the word. I think we were all a bunch of horrid little boys because of the loss of security.”

Read More…Three on a Match – The New Yorker.

Ari Roth, Director of Jewish Theater, Is Fired

By MICHAEL PAULSON, DEC. 19, 2014

A prominent but polarizing director of Jewish theater has been fired from his longtime perch at the Jewish Community Center in Washington after several productions that raised challenging questions about Israel.

Ari Roth, a 53-year-old playwright who had served as artistic director of the Jewish Community Center’s Theater for 18 years, was removed on Thursday. He plans to start an independent theater company, called Mosaic, also in Washington.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/20/theater/ari-roth-director-of-jewish-theater-is-fired.html